The Global Competitiveness Report 2010–2011

The global competitiveness Report is published by World Economic Forum.

Description of the report

Switzerland tops the overall ranking in The Global Competitiveness Report 2010-2011 released by the World Economic Forum. The United States falls two places to fourth position, overtaken by Sweden (2nd) and Singapore (3rd). The Nordic countries continue to be well positioned in the ranking, with Sweden, Finland (7th) and Denmark (9th) among the top 10, and with Norway at 14th.  Sweden overtakes the US and Singapore this year to be placed 2nd overall. The United Kingdom, after falling in the rankings over recent years, moves back up by one place to 12th position.

The rankings are calculated from both publicly available data and the Executive Opinion Survey, a comprehensive annual survey conducted by the World Economic Forum together with its network of Partner Institutes (leading research institutes and business organizations) in the countries covered by the Report.

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PAST REPORTS

The Global Competitiveness Report 2009-2010 The Global Competitiveness Report 2009-2010
Browse the Report
View the Interactive Report
Country Highlights
Download the full Report
Interviews with the Report’s co-authors
The Global Competitiveness Report 2008-2009 The Global Competitiveness Report 2008-2009
Browse the Report
View the Interactive Report
Country Highlights (9 pg; 348 kb)
Rankings in full (1 pg; 221 Kb)
Interviews with the Report’s co-authors
The Global Competitiveness Report 2008-2009 The Global Competitiveness Report 2008-2009
Browse the Report
View the Interactive Report
Country Highlights (9 pg; 348 kb)
Rankings in full (1 pg; 221 Kb)
Interviews with the Report’s co-authors
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One thought on “The Global Competitiveness Report 2010–2011

  1. “Improve competitiveness” is a mantra frequently heard in discussions of how countries can increase economic growth. What that slogan actually means is that global corporations want workers in developed countries to agree to wage reductions to levels similar to those in the People’s Republic of China. The unspoken threat is that workers will be driven to accept such reductions inevitably.

    Wages in China are actually rising due to the country’s success in extracting manufacturing jobs from the rest of the world. The correct policy that should be pursued by developed countries and China is to have the PRC adjust its labor markets so that Chinese workers’ wages continue to converge with those of workers in developing countries.

    Increased standards of living for Chinese workers will mean less of a reduction in standards of living in developed countries. In some industries, Chinese goods are already not competitive with similar goods produced in developed countries due to transportation costs.

    Executive management currently colludes with a corrupt PRC system to extract the value of increased productivity throughout the world to increase the wealth of the top 1% of society…the super-rich. Workers throughout the world need to organize to reject the “competitiveness” propaganda and restructure the distribution of wealth more fairly.

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